Which Brand of Swim Spa?

When you’ve decided you want to buy a swim spa, how do you possibly choose which brand or model to buy? There are dozens of different features, options, and accessories, and the combinations seem endless. Fortunately, there are a few features you can use to help judge a swim spa and figure out whether it’s the right one for you.

Swim Spa being used by a swimmer as shown from above

Before going to a store, be prepared with a list of features you find more desirable to make your swim spa experience as fulfilling as possible. Consider how you plan on using the swim spa and how much time you will spend exercising or relaxing. A few of the common features to look for are listed below.

  • Seats. If you only plan on using your swim spa to get a good morning’s workout, you won’t have to worry about seating. If you anticipate using the swim spa primarily as a hot tub for relaxation, however, comfortable seating is very important. The location of the seating in the swim spa will need to be considered, as well
  • Massage jets. Like the seating, these will be less important for working out but are vital for full relaxation and enjoyment. However, jets can be very useful for serious swimmers to loosen their muscles before or after exercising.
  • Built in radios. Some people find they get a better exercise experience if they can hear music while they swim, so a built-in radio or underwater speakers is a great investment. They are also very popular for relaxation; few things are more comforting than listening to classical instrumental music while relaxing in a hot tub.

If you’re looking to buy a swim spa today, contact a dealer near you. If you want to find out more about Swim Spa Covers and how to take care of them, contact SpaCap.com today.

Inground vs. Above Ground Hot Tub

One of the biggest decisions consumers are faced with when purchasing and installing a hot tub is whether to go with an in-ground or above-ground, free standing solution. Price alone often dictates the decision, but other factors come into play. You don’t want to install a permanent hot tub only to find you aren’t using it a year later. The following are a few factors to consider when looking into buying a hot tub.


  • Permanence and portability. If you know you want a hot tub on your property for as long as you live there and you want to build a hot tub to add to your home’s property hot tub and poolvalue, choose an in-ground tub. However, if you are unsure of where you want your hot tub to go or of how long you plan on keeping it, opt for an above-ground tub. They are portable and can be sold whenever the owner wishes without any major changes having to be made to the yard or patio.


  • Cost. In-ground hot tubs cost more to install, but may add value to your home’s property value if or when you choose to move. They are also more expensive to maintain. However, if you are installing an in-ground pool, adding on a hot tub will be much more economical and easier.


  • Aesthetics. A major benefit of in-ground pools and hot tubs is that they are low profile and blend into the ground. Above ground hot tubs, on the other hand, are large and bulky and stand out in the yard, patio, or porch. In-ground hot tubs also give the illusion of taking up less space.


  • Safety. From a purely analytical view point, free standing above ground spas have fewer accidental drownings. If you want to go with an in-ground installation, leaving the edge of the spa bench high, (sixteen to eighteen inches above the deck surface) greatly reduces the risk. Plus it makes it convenient for users to approach, sit down and enter the spa.


If you are considering installing a hot tub in your yard or on your porch, talk with a contractor and discuss all of your options, taking into account the features listed here. No matter how you install your new hot tub you’ll need a great cover to go with it. At SpaCap.com we have been custom building great Hot Tub Covers for years. We would love to build one for you.

Relief from Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is an uncomfortable condition that plagues an estimated 10 percent of the American population. Restless Leg Syndrome is a nervous system disorder that causes strange sensations in the legs, ranging from itchy to “pins and needles.” These feelings are typically relieved by moving the legs, and as such, sufferers of Restless Leg Syndrome often feel the need to move their legs even while trying to sleep. This usually affects an RLS sufferer’s sleep patterns, leading to the classification as a sleep disorder. While it’s difficult to reverse the disease, there are ways to cope with the symptoms. One effective method that many people have discovered is using hot tubs and saunas. Below are a few of the symptoms of Restless Leg Syndrome and ways to treat them.


  • Pain and discomfort increase in the legs while you are resting. By soaking in the hot tub, you are relaxing your lower body while at the same time using the massage jets to relieve the discomfort. The constant movement of the water over the legs can bring immediate relieve, even when the legs are held still.


  • Pain goes away when the legs are moved. This is one of the surest signs of Restless Leg Syndrome, and by stretching your calves and thighs in the hot tub you can relieve the symptoms. Jogging and other moderate exercise can also help.


  • Inability to rest or get sleep due to Restless Leg Syndrome discomfort. Moderate exercising of the legs combined with cutting down on caffeine and smoking can help sufferers get better sleep, and soaking in a hot tub before bed may relax the muscles and soothe the nerves while also preparing the body for rest.


If you suspect you have Restless Leg Syndrome, contact your physician to get a proper diagnosis. If he or she recommends soaking in hot tub to relieve symptoms, contact SpaCap.com to find out more about hot tub care and maintenance.

If you choose to use a hot tub for therapy before bed, one thing you want to avoid after getting all nice and relaxed is straining yourself replacing a heavy cover back on the spa. The good news is at SpaCap.com we have been building lightweight Hot Tub Covers for nearly thirty years. Visit our website and get one for yourself. Your back will thank you.

Troubleshooting Common Hot Tub Problems

While a spa or hot tub is designed for relaxation, there is nothing more stressful than having a problem or issue you don’t know how to solve. Thankfully, the majority of spa and hot tub problems can be easily fixed or alleviated. The following are a few of the most common hot tub issues and how to fix them:

1. Cloudy water. Hot water is by nature slightly cloudy, but if the water is cloudier than usual, you may have a dirty or broken filter. If the filter has a small clog, it may be easy to fix. Completely clogged or broken filters have to be replaced.

2. Not heating. Problems with heating are usually due to a faulty heater, which will usually require professional services to address. However, the problem could be due to a dirty filter, which can be cleaned easily.

3. Jets aren’t working. This could be due to a clog in the water pipes, but is most likely due to a pump problem. Another possibility could be that the jets were simply turned off without anyone’s knowledge. Twist the face of the jets and see if water begins flowing. A final possibility is an air block in the pump, which can be easily handled by loosening the fittings on the pipes. Incidentally, the hot tub will not heat if the pump is not working properly, so a heating problem could also be attributed to a broken pump.

4. Excessive foaming. This is probably due to soap or hair products that are unwittingly brought into the hot tub by users. Fortunately, the foaming is not dangerous and can easily be treated with a foam reducer. Add the reducer to the water on a regular basis or until the hot tub no longer foams.

5. Heavy Cover. This happens when the foam in the hot tub covers become saturated with moisture. It happens slowly so you may not notice it right away. What happens is the warm water in the hot tub creates steam and the steam gets up into the foam where it condenses back into water. The water once trapped in the foam will make the cover too heavy to get off and on the hot tub. The best solution is to replace the rigid, heavy foam filled cover with one that does not use foam. Visit SpaCap.com and find out why we use air chambers instead of foam. Our Hot Tub Covers don’t get saturated so they stay light weight and easy to use.

To learn more about potential problems and taking care of hot tubs, contact SpaCap.com.

Enjoying a dip in the hot tub
Hot Tubs just make life better.

Using a Hot Tub to Treat Freckles

According to the definition found on WebMD, Freckles are small brown spots usually found on the face and arms. Freckles are extremely common and are not a health threat. They are more often seen in the summer, especially among lighter-skinned people and people with light or red hair.

Freckles are for the most part harmless and effect a large percentage of the North American population.

Though many with the condition do not feel the need to treat it, others may let it negatively effect their self esteem and lose sleep over it.

For the latter, there is hope in the experimental use of hot tubs to treat the symptoms.

Although no specific reduction of freckles has as yet been recorded, a significant improvement of mood and sense of wellbeing is not uncommon. A few of the benefits are listed below and we will update this material once the final results of the study are published:

  • Since the pain and discomfort that can accompany Freckles is usually limited to the self-esteem, it is best overcome in a safe and comfortable environment. The Hot Tub is a great place to begin. To start the subject should be accompanied by one or more support personnel with whom they are comfortable. Once the subject feels the acceptance of the support person, they can begin to relax in the soothing warm water of the spa.


  • Increased blood flow to the skin tissues may diminish the contrast of freckles. Although temporary, the visual effect may lessen self-consciousness and increase relaxation and will generally lead to a better nights sleep.


  • Smiles have long been known to be contagious. The peace, satisfaction and comfort the subject feels in the Hot Tub invariably lead to a satisfied smile on their face. No matter how many Freckles a person may have, a smile will improve their self worth.


If you suspect you have Freckles, you may feel the need to contact your physician to get a proper diagnosis. Ask the doctor if you are healthy enough for soaking in hot tub to relieve symptoms.


Authors note: Should any Freckles fade while using the hot tub, please check the spa water chemicals. We recommend switching to a non-chlorine water treatment for the health of your skin. Bleaching the freckles off by exposure to high doses of chlorine is not safe. Also, this article is meant to be for fun and should be regarded in anyway medically proven.

It should also be noted that although the author does have freckles he is not an expert on them. He does however have extensive knowledge and expertise regarding Hot Tub Covers. Should you or someone you know suffer from “Heavy Hot Tub Cover Syndrome” please do not hesitate to visit SpaCap.com.Beautiful Freckles

Luxury: Bringing the Spa Home

A trip to the spa reduces stress and increases endorphins, especially during the holiday season. However, not everyone can afford frequent trips to the spa. Although some people have spa elements such as hot tubs in their home, they often get stumped as to how they can replicate a professional spa experience without sacrificing too much time or money.

There are plenty of inexpensive and fun ways to have a luxurious spa experience at home. Today, SpaCap will explore some of the most common of these and give tips on how to make each experience your own.

Woman Relaxing in the Hot Tub

Tub Yoga

Yoga is often used to help relax the body and center the mind and spirit. When combined with the hot tub, a safe and easy yoga routine becomes twice as beneficial. Several hot tub yoga DVDs and other guides are available to teach you some of the easiest and most effective yoga poses. These techniques can be done alone or with a partner. They include the boat pose, the warrior one pose, and more. Hot tub yoga also employs massage techniques. If you’re massaging solo, try an exfoliating massage with a gentle brush. With a partner, you can each massage pressure points in the other’s neck, shoulders, feet, and back.

Thai Massage

Thai massage is a more active form of traditional massage focused on stretching tense muscles and increasing pressure points’ endurance. Thai massage can use either elevated or flat surfaces, so you can do routines modified for water no matter the size and elevation of your tub. You may want to visit a Thai massage therapist first so he or she can teach you the basic stretches used. These are best done with a partner since stretching with someone and pushing against them increases resistance and endurance. For optimum results, you should use feet, elbows, and hands to stretch and relax pressure points.

Tub Facials

For a quick and inexpensive facial, skip the spa and go straight to your hot tub. Wash your face with cold water to remove any makeup, oils, or dirt. Then soak for several minutes so the heat and steam can open your pores. When your face feels relaxed, you can apply a homemade spa mask. Experts recommend papaya, green or chamomile tea, and lemon with Greek yogurt.

With all these great ideas to promote your relaxation its easy to forget some of the details that might take away from that ultimate goal. Like forgetting to bring out a towel for when you get out of the hot tub. Here at SpaCap our goal is to not let a heavy hot tub cover be one of those irritations. Because all traditional foam filled covers will eventually end up saturated and heavy we designed a totally different easy to use hot tub cover. Visit SpaCap.com and see why we think every spa owner needs one of our covers.

Keeping Safe Around the Hot Tub

The hot tub is meant to be safe and relaxing, particularly during stressful seasons like the holidays. Unfortunately, hot tubs also come with unique safety issues owners should be aware of before opening the tub to guests. Fall and winter are particularly uncertain times for hot tub users because increased rain and colder weather may make the hot tub area slippery, icy, or at the least, unpleasantly cold. SpaCap has provided a few tips to make sure colder weather doesn’t mean you must close the hot tub altogether.

Stay Sanitary

Unsanitary hot tubs lead to rashes, ear infections, yeast infections, and other illnesses. Guests who have recently experienced colds or the flu can easily spread germs in the hot tub even if they’ve been well for several days. To avoid illness and infection, always keep hot tub sanitizer handy and check sanitizer levels frequently. Close the hot tub to check the water’s pH balance at least once a week. Keep spa cleaners and other chemicals out of direct sunlight and out of children’s reach, and never mix them before pouring them into the tub. Encourage guests to shower or bathe before entering and after exiting the hot tub.

Don’t Drink and Swim

Drinking in the hot tub can be as dangerous as drinking and driving. Hot water increases the effects of alcohol and various drugs or medications. If you are on potent meds, consult your doctor about whether a hot tub is safe. Never mix medication and alcohol, and do not drink while in the hot tub. A good alternative to alcohol is a chilled mocktail, juice, or soda – the cold drink will entice you to enjoy the hot water more.

No Babies on Board

Pregnant women should not use hot tubs because the extreme water temperatures and chemicals, as well as prolonged exposure, may harm the fetus. Infants should never be placed in a hot tub, as they could drown even with a parent nearby.

Slips, Slides, and More

Since the area around a hot tub is wet, people are likely to slip or trip no matter how careful you are. This is where a little attention to how the area around your spa is laid out can make a big difference when it comes to safety.

If possible, outfit your tub with railings or easy steps to help people get in and out more safely. I’m not a big fan of having a handrail that goes into the water but there are some really nice alternatives available. Some that mount onto the spa cabinet of a set of stairs next to it. Giving your self and your guests a good hand hold getting in and out of the spa can be really helpful.

Another place for a handrail would be on the way to and from the hot tub. If you live in an area that gets a lot of ice and snow I would even consider putting one up around the spa to make it easy to walk around the hot tub in any conditions.

Encourage guests to wear shoes until they enter the tub. If conditions are icy clear the snow and throw down some deicer to give your guests good footing to and from the spa. Naturally, you don’t want any of the deicer to end up in the spa so having a way for them to sit and take off their shoes before entering the spa is a must.

Also, tell guests with long hair to pull it back before entering the tub. Long hair can get caught in the drain or drain cover if adults duck underwater. Children should never be allowed to play underwater in the hot tub.

A Heavy Cover can be dangerous. If your hot tub cover has become more than one person can safely handle, it’s time to replace it with something better. At SpaCap.com we specialize in Hot Tub Covers that are lightweight and easy to use. Order one for your spa today before you hurt yourself.
Hot Tub Relaxing

Let the Hot Tub Games Begin

With America’s increasing awareness of physical health has come an increasing desire to stay active and make exercise fun. Most people don’t associate the hot tub with exercise – in fact, they associate it with passive relaxation. Yet a hot tub can be the ideal place for physical activity, especially family games. If you seek to stay active and lose or maintain weight during the holidays, hot tub games are an easy, painless way to do so. SpaCap has found some of the most popular family hot tub games for you and your loved ones to enjoy.

Hot Tub WaterHot Tub Hockey

You’ll need: A Ping-Pong ball or rubber ducky.

Object of the game: To get the floating object to the other team’s side of the tub using water or air.

How to play: Form teams of 2-4 people each. Each team sits on its own side of the hot tub. On a signal, each team tries to get their object to touch the opposite side of the tub to earn one point. The object cannot be touched, but blowing, splashing, and making waves are allowed. The first team to earn three points wins.

Ping-Pong Panic

You’ll need: Several Ping-Pong balls.

Object of the game: To stay in the tub without letting balls touch you.

How to play: On a signal, someone drops five Ping-Pong balls into the hot tub. Everyone must then scramble away from the balls. The balls cannot touch you, nor can you touch a ball with any part of your body. You must keep feet inside the tub at all times. If a ball touches you, you must sit outside the tub until there is one player left. Every fifteen seconds, two balls must be added to the tub. The last person inside is the winner.

Pass the Bottle

You’ll need: A durable plastic bottle filled with water, tightly capped.

Object of the game: To pass the bottle completely around the hot tub without using your hands.

How to Play: Players may sit in different places around the hot tub. Players can pass the bottle using any body part, including backsides, except their hands. Players may not use the same body parts twice in a row (e.g.: don’t pass the bottle from your neck to another persons neck; pass from neck to knee, neck to arm, etc.) If the bottle is dropped, the player who drops it must perform a penalty task and the game starts again. If you get good at passing a sealed bottle, try passing an opened one without spilling anything. You can also use open or closed bottles that have been in the freezer for extra fun.

Any time you plan on having fun playing games or just relaxing in the hot tub, the last thing you want between you and your goal is a heavy hot tub cover. That’s where we come in. Here at SpaCap.com, we have been building Custom Hot Tub Covers designed to stay light and easy to use for thirty years. Why not order one for yourself today?

Hot Tub Fun for Kids

“Hot tubs” and “kids” aren’t traditionally considered good combinations. In fact, most of what we hear about hot tubs and children involves danger. However, kids love hot tubs. They simply need quality supervision and their own activities to make them fun. SpaCap researched ways to make hot tubs and spas kid-friendly, and we came up with a few ideas to make sure your children can enjoy these places with you.Hot Tub Party Animal


Throw a Fabulous Spa Party


Spa parties are popular for birthdays, Christmas and other holidays, or “just because” days. They can be done for children aged six and older, with specific tweaking for each age group. Consider these specifics:


Number of guests: Between 4-6. Spa parties involve plenty of personalized pampering. If there are too many guests, there may not be enough attention to go around. Also, the party may get too loud. Keep the guests’ ages as close as possible.


Invitations: Fold invitations to look like purses and write something like, “You’re invited to a spa day!” Write the who, what, when, and where on the purse, or if desired, cut the purse so that it opens up.


Dress code: Have guests wear their coziest pajamas and bathrobes. If possible, use a towel warmer so no one freezes in between activities, especially in fall and winter. If you’ll use the hot tub, ask guests to wear bathing suits under their robes or bring suits with them.


Food: Think “appetizers.” If your pool or hot tub has a swim-up bar, the guests can eat there. If they would prefer to eat inside the hot tub, try these ideas:


  • Veggie trays with dip securely anchored in the center.


  • Securely anchored chip and dip trays.


  • Fruit kabobs/cheese cubes, sausage balls, and other snacks on toothpicks (clean up toothpicks right away to avoid any toothpick-and-tub mishaps).


  • “Floating drinks.” Cut a hole into a pool noodle so a cooler or Rubbermaid container can float around the pool or hot tub. Stock the container with cold sodas, water, or juices. You can also try punch or teach guests to make “mocktails.”


  • Cupcakes or smaller sweets such as fudge squares or miniature cookies. Because of the candles, save the birthday cake for the end of the party.


Games: Guests can play games such as Ping-Pong Panic, Pass the Bottle, Hot Tub Hockey, and more. If desired, guests can also play card games, but make sure cards are waterproof or at least extremely durable.




  • Musical manicures. Each guest brings a favorite color of nail polish. Guests then sit at a table, each holding their own polish bottle. The music starts, and during the song, guests pass nail polish bottles to the left or right. (To make it more fun, you can tell guests to pass to the left or the right whenever they hear a specific word). When the music stops, each guest paints one finger with the color she’s holding. The game continues this way until everyone’s fingers are painted.


  • Facials. Have guests relax in lounge chairs or on a deck, covered with blankets or warm towels if the weather is cold. Make masks using lemon, green tea, banana and honey, or papaya. Of course, each guest gets cucumbers on his or her eyelids. Play relaxing instrumental music while the facials set.


  • Foot soak. Make a special foot soak for each guest using baking soda, salt, citric acid, and your favorite fragrance. Have guests soak their feet for a relaxing start or finish to the party. To stop germs from spreading, everyone gets his or her own bucket.


Favors: These depend entirely on your taste. They can include a gift certificate to a local spa, miniature towels embroidered with guests’ names, or small bottles of favorite lotions or body sprays.

Make throwing your party easier with an attractive, lightweight hot tub cover from SpaCap.com. Kids and heavy Hot Tub Covers don’t mix. Actually, heavy covers and adults don’t mix either for that matter. Visit a custom made spa cover from SpaCap.com before your next party.

Hot Tubs for People with Disabilities

As our world becomes increasingly inclusive, people with disabilities get the chance to participate in activities their able-bodied counterparts have always enjoyed, but from which disabled persons have traditionally been excluded. As a result, people with disabilities are more active than ever. However, people with disabilities often have trouble being included at the hot tub or spa. Obstacles like slippery hot tubs and steeply raised massage tables often make people with disabilities think they should just skip those activities. Yet with the right modifications, the hot tub and spa can be fun places for all.

Accessibility is Key

To enjoy an activity, you must first be able to access it. If hot tub and spa guests have disabilities, plan accordingly. Outfit hot tubs and pools with railings and small steps so guests can get in and out independently. Make sure that the hot tub temperature is low enough to allow for your guests to linger longer without becoming over heated.

If this is going to be part of the regular use for your hot tub, consider lowering it or partially sinking it into the deck so that it presents a height of 18″ for easy access, with a bench around it so that users can sit and remove their shoes safely before entering. Also a bench around the outside will allow them to get out and sit comfortably if the temperature becomes too much.

Encourage guests to wear shoes until they enter the tub or pool to prevent slips and falls.

Offer several massage options, including those that can be done through clothing, so a person with a disability doesn’t have to worry about fastening and unfastening clothing before a massage. If the person would prefer a nude or partially nude massage but needs help with removing clothing, offer assistance from a trustworthy attendant of the same gender. Help guests on and off raised tables, or better yet offer massage options that can be done on bench high tables or the floor.

Exercise is Not a Chore

Many people with disabilities are told constantly to exercise, sometimes to the point that it feels like a punishment. Give these guests a break at your spa. Discuss the benefits of hydrotherapy, but make it clear the hot tub and pool are first and foremost for fun and relaxation. Offer easy exercises such as hot tub yoga, and emphasize that the person can modify the stretches however he or she wants. Encourage guests to play hot tub games like Hot Tub Hockey, Submarine, or Ping-Pong Panic.

Offer a Plethora of Pampering

People with disabilities, especially women, often struggle to feel beautiful. Help them out with facials and manicures. Some people with disabilities have skin conditions or are allergic to certain facial ingredients, so always ask before facials or body wraps begin. Some disabilities also involve sensory processing difficulties, so ask if your guest is particularly sensitive to any taste or smell. Offer several fragrance and lotion options, and be sensitive to guests who do not like being touched.

Accommodate don’t Dictate

Do not force participation in any activity. If your guest with a disability just showed up to spend three hours swimming, or to get one facial, respect their wishes.

It wouldn’t be fair to talk about ease of access without mentioning SpaCap.com. Their Custom Hot Tub Covers are truly user friendly. Over the past thirty years they have sold quite a few to people who have limited mobility and need to get into their hot tub for therapy daily. At SpaCap.com they work hard to make using a hot tub cover easy for every situation. Sometimes because of specific needs, they have to allow for lifting or pulling the cover off and on by pulleys. However the light weight design of the SpaCap makes using their hot tub easy.

If you have a hot tub and want to make it easy for someone to use, we would love to talk with you about how to get that done. And Yes, we can even accommodate hand rails that extend down into the water.